Cons and cosplay.

I spent this weekend with the aforementioned dear friend/houseguest and had an excellent time exploring different parts of the Bay Area. She’s from the Midwest, so of course we needed to go to the ocean and take a day trip into San Francisco. We also stopped at Fanime/Clockwork Alchemy in San Jose on Saturday to see the cosplayers. Where else can you see Ariel from The Little Mermaid walking down the street casually with Kylo Ren?

I’ve been going to cons with my friends for almost a decade but don’t cosplay too often. When I do it’s never anything too fancy—quite the opposite, actually, given my limited skills with a sewing machine/clay/paint/wig styling. More than once I’ve chosen to cosplay characters whose costumes can be deliberately crappy. (My favorite was in 2012, when my friends and I cosplayed cosplayers from Inspector Spacetime, a thinly veiled parody of Doctor Who from the sitcom Community. It basically consisted of stuff we already had plus maybe $10 of stuff scavenged from Goodwill and Dollar Tree–things like bathrobes and toy sheriff’s badges, and things made of cardboard). But after every con I always come home thinking that I want my next cosplay to be an actual good one.

The idea of having a big summer sewing project is appealing, but I’m doubtful of my abilities and discipline. I’ll think about it. First I’d need to figure out who I even want to dress up as.

Or I could just take my accordion to a con, hang out around the corner from a Zelda cosplayer gathering, and play Kass’s theme.

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Accordion, video games, and cleaning.

A dear friend is coming to visit for a few days this week, so I spent much of the past week stressing out about cleaning et cetera. Nothing like an impending houseguest to make you look at your place of residence and realize oh crap, this place is a dump! (It’s not actually that much of a dump. But it does need to be vacuumed.)

So that hasn’t left much time for pursuing creative endeavors (and I’m not expecting to make a whole lot of progress by next week, either). But I did retrieve my old accordion from my parents’ house today.

I started playing accordion in 2010 but stopped in 2012 when I left to live abroad for a few years. Before my departure I took it in to a local accordion shop to have it examined, and while the technician was impressed that it was in such good condition (it had been sitting in a garage for 40 years before it came into my possession) she recommended that it be worked on before being used to any great extent. It would have been several hundred dollars’ worth of repairs* so I put it back in its case and put it in a closet, where it remained until I returned in 2015. Even after that I only pulled it out sporadically, not wanting to cause any more damage until I had the money to spare to fix it up.

Then I started playing Breath of the Wild and heard Kass’s theme, a pleasant little accordion ditty that made me want to stop in the middle of playing and listen to it for a while. And then it made me want to grab an accordion and try to play it by ear.

Video game music has had a big influence on my since I was quite young, actually. I remember thinking the credits theme from Super Mario World was one of the prettiest things I’d ever heard. (And that was back when video game music was still chiptunes that drove my mother up the wall.) When I was in fifth grade and took up clarinet in band I would hang out with my friends after band practice and try to play the ocarina songs from Ocarina of Time. And one of the first songs I learned to play on the accordion was “London 3” from Professor Layton and the Unwound Future. A very large portion of my music library is music from OC ReMix (which I’ve been following/lurking on since 2004) and other video game covers and rearrangements. Despite never having successfully finished Chrono Trigger or any Final Fantasy game, I have a special fondness for the music of Yasunori Mitsuda and Nobuo Uematsu.

So Kass’s theme is next on the list, though I really should look into that accordion repair. But right now I need to focus on cleaning the kitchen.

*Still cheaper than getting a new accordion, which run in the thousands of dollars for a well-made one.

Stepping out.

I finally did it—I attended an SCBWI event. And it was totally worth it.

A neighboring regional chapter hosted a workshop on revision techniques yesterday, led by a local professional (bestselling) author. It was truly fantastic, and completely worth the 45-minute drive.

I’m still in that gap between Draft 2 and 3 on the novel I started in 2010. There are a few parts that I know need to be rewritten that I’ve been avoiding. After yesterday’s workshop I realize I’ve been avoiding rewriting it because it’s actually boring. I’ve got my work cut out for me—and a lot of different tacks I can take.

Another memorable takeaway from the workshop was an exercise in determining a story’s theme. “It’s 10 years after the events of your story. Imagine that you’re at a bar or a coffee shop and your main character sits down next to you. You get to talking, and the character recounts his or her experiences. Then you ask, ‘So what did you learn from all of that?’ What does your character reply?”

That’s one I’m going to be chewing on for a bit.

Drumming and reading.

Drum performance went well, though the best part is probably the camaraderie I’ve found within the group. Since joining I’ve been invited to birthdays and happy hours and have really gotten to know everyone a lot better than if I’d limited my contact to just classes and rehearsals.

Haven’t been keeping up as well with the creative endeavors per se, but I did make dedicated time for reading, which professional authors seem to universally agree is an essential part of being a writer. I must have finished four or five books this week alone. Granted, they were pretty much all middle grade, which tend to be fast reads (and working in an environment with lots of kids and books makes access to them easy). But there’s some certain honesty that middle grade fiction tends to have in abundance that I rarely find in YA or adult literature—an honesty that allows mounds of subtext without taking away from an engaging surface narrative. C. S. Lewis famously remarked in his essay “Sometimes Fairy Stories May Best Say What’s to Be Said” that “a book worth reading only in childhood is not worth reading even then.” I’m very pleased to be discovering (and rediscovering) the surprising depths in these books ostensibly aimed at middle schoolers.

Also, I have to say this: Diary of a Wimpy Kid is truly funny. Its protagonist is such an awful role model, so realistically self-centered and unaware. I had to stop myself from spit-taking on some of the pages.